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Open map of IsraelFlag of IsraelIsrael / Geography /
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Dead Sea
Arabic: 'al-bahr 'al-mayyit Play sound
Hebrew: yam ha-melah



Dead Sea.
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Satellite view of the Dead Sea in 1999. The lake is decreasing year by year. Isreal and Palestine to the left, Jordan to the right. Photo: NASA.

Shores of Dead Sea. Here on the Jordan side.
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Shores of Dead Sea. Here on the Jordan side.

Not swimming, rather floating on the Dead Sea.
Tourists covering themselves in Dead Sea mud. Said to be good for diseases and the skin.

Salt formations of the Dead Sea.
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Salt formations of the Dead Sea.

Salt formations of the Dead Sea.
Salt formations of the Dead Sea.

Salt lake of Jordan, Palestine, and Israel, which is the lowest water surface on earth, at minus 395 metres compared to the level of the Mediterranean Sea.
The Dead Sea has an area of 1,050 kmē, with a length of 76 km, and a maximum width of 16 km. Maximum depth is 396 metres. The Dead Sea is geologically part of the Rift Valley system. The principal source of the Dead Sea is the Jordan River, but there are other streams feeding it too. There is no outlet for the lake, and evaporation leads to the high content of salt, as it is about 6 times more salty than the ocean water. Among the salts in the Dead Sea are sodium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, potassium chloride, and magnesium bromide. There is no life in the lake.
Extraction of potash, bromine, gypsum, salt and other chemical products is one of the few effective means of utilizing the Dead Sea as a resource. Near the Dead Sea lies Qumran, where the Dead Sea scrolls were found, and the important Israeli national monument of Masada.




By Tore Kjeilen