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Open map of Ancient EgyptAncient Egypt / Religion / Karnak /
Temple of Amon
Also called: Temple of Amon-Re; Temple of Amun



Temple of Amon, Karnak, Luxor, Egypt.
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Temple of Amon, Karnak, Luxor, Egypt.
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

Temple of Amon, Karnak, Luxor, Egypt.
ZOOM - Open a large version of this image

Temple of Amon at Karnak

Travel information from
LookLex / Egypt
Temple of Amon
Great columns
Obelisks
Huge statues
Wall decorations
Sacred Lake
Scarab statue
Southern Pylons

In Ancient Egyptian Religion, the dominant temple at Karnak complex, which was part of the ancient city, Thebes, now in modern Luxor, Egypt.
The temple was dedicated to the head god amon the Egyptian gods, the male deity of the Theban Triad, Amon. Its impressive scale is furthermore linked to Thebes being the capital of Egypt for centuries, and even after losing that position, it would remain an important and wealthy city.
The temple consists mainly of 4 sections; Forecourt, the Great Hypostyle Hall, the Central Court; and the Festival Hall.
The building process of the temple structure represent a continuous process over centuries, in which numerous kings added shrines, decorations or obelisks. The great scala belongs to constructions of the New Kingdom, beginning with the 18th Dynasty around 1500 BCE. The entrance, which is called 1st Pylon now, dates some 1200 later, and was built by the 30th Dynasty king, Nectanebo 1.
The temple is unusual in having two axis, one running in eastern direction, then with a series of pylons in southern direction, attaching midway to the main axis of the temple. This second axis served to connect the Temple of Amon his consort, Mut, who had a temple erected 400 metres away.
Among the rooms that make the Temple of Amon stand out, it is especially the Great Hypostyle Hall, which is distinct. With it its 140 by 75 metres it is among the world's largest religious rooms. Its roof is 21 metres high, and held up by 134 columns, but only 12 of the columns are the full height, the remainder with a added section on top.
The number of rooms to the temple is actually hard to assess, due to the level of destruction in some areas. It may be between 80 and 100 roofed rooms, in addition to several open courtyards.




By Tore Kjeilen