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Ancient Egypt
1. Introduction
2. People
3. Life styles
4. Culture
5. Education and Science
6. Society
7. Economy
8. Government
9. Cities and Villages
10. Language
11. Religion
12. Kings / periods
13. History
14. Map



























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Open map of Ancient EgyptAncient Egypt / Cities and Villages /
Thinis



Funerary stela of the royal sealer Indi and his wife, the Priestess of Hathor Mutmuti of Thinis. Now in Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
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Funerary stela of the royal sealer Indi and his wife, the Priestess of Hathor Mutmuti of Thinis. Now in Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

Statue, now lost, possibly from Thinis, showing Hati with Anuris and Mehyt. Photo from 1920.
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Statue, now lost, possibly from Thinis, showing Hati with Anuris and Mehyt. Photo from 1920.

Thinis

Early capital of predynastic and Ancient Egypt. While Thinis clearly has existed, its ruins have never been located. It is believed that it was in Upper Egypt, some kilometres north of Abydos, which served as its necropolis. Its modern location would then be near the village of Girga.
To Thinis, the Thinite Period and Thinis Region, belongs. Both relate to the era when Thinis was the capital of one of the strongest kingdoms of predynastic Egypt. It would emerge as the national capital after unification, or at least as the residence town of the king, for the 1st and 2nd Dynasties. During this era, Memphis, appears to have been the actual administrative centre, and sometime before or with the emergence of the 3rd Dynasty, Thinis would lose its position entirely.
As Thinis lost its functions, Abydos would emerge as the compensation, caretaking regional sentiments being an important religious centre, though no longer burial ground for kings.
Due to its location never having been found, nothing can be said about Thinis' size and organization. However, it may well have had similar or large in size and with equal organization as the contemporary towns of Hierakonpolis and Naqada, areas where excavations have been undertaken.





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By Tore Kjeilen