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Ancient Egypt /
Religion
1. Introduction
2. Gods
3. Concepts
4. Cult
5. Cult centres
6. Necropolises
7. Structures

Detailed articleAncient Egypt



























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Open map of Ancient EgyptAncient Egypt / Religion / Gods /
Wadjet
Other spelling: Wadjyt
Also called: Edjo; Uto; Buto



Wadjet cobras in the royal crown.

Wadjet cobras in the royal crown. From the Tomb of Prince Khaemwast, Valley of the Queens, Luxor.

Wadjet as a lion goddess, a late representation. This is from a 8th century BCE <A HREF=stele.htm>stele</A> of King <A HREF=shabaqo.htm>Shabaqo</A>.
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Wadjet as a lion goddess, a late representation. This is from a 8th century BCE stele of King Shabaqo.

In Ancient Egyptian Religion, cobra-goddess of mainly symbolic importance as patron goddess of Lower Egypt.
Wadjet represented together with Nekhbet the duality of Egypt; they were called nebty, the "two ladies."
As patron goddess of Lower Egypt she was seen as wife of Hapy, the god of the inundation of the Nile.
She was represented as a cobra, often looking identical with Renenutet. The two goddesses would eventually have their personalities merged.
As a protector goddess, she was often seen on the head of Re. It is from her that the Ureaeus symbol has come. She was also associated with the Eye of Re. Furthermore, she developed into becoming the goddess of heat and fire, and would become associated with the war goddess of Lower Egypt, Bastet, to form the united Wadjet-Bastet. This combination paved for an association with Mut, which would create the united deity Mut-Wadjet-Bastet.
In later periods, she was represented as a woman with a snake's head, or as a woman wearing the Uraeus symbol.
Wadjet would during the Late Period be represented as a lion goddess, practically identical with Sekhmet.
Her cult was centred to Buto in the Nile Delta. Buto had been the capital of Lower Egypt in pre-dynastic times (4th millennium BCE), which was the reason for her regional importance. Since her prominence in the earliest centuries of Egyptian civilization in the 4th millennium BCE, it would not happen again until the 1st millennium BCE that her importance beyond Buto was revived. In this, her latest form, she was called Buto.





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By Tore Kjeilen