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Granada/Alhambra



Alhambra
Introduction

1. The Mexuar

2. The Serallo

3. The Lions' Court

4. The Harem

5. Ladies' Tower

6. Alcazaba

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Alhambra, the Serallo

Alhambra, Granada, Spain: The Serallo

Photo: Tor Eigeland/Saudi Aramco World/PADIA


Alhambra, Granada, Spain: The Serallo

The Patio of Mytles, seen in direction south. Photo: Tor Eigeland/Saudi Aramco World/PADIA

Alhambra, Granada, Spain: The Serallo

The Patio of Myrtles, seen in direction north, with the Comares Tower in the back. Inside this lies the Hall of the Boat and the Hall of the Ambassadors. Photo: Tor Eigeland/Saudi Aramco World/PADIA

Alhambra, Granada, Spain: The Serallo

The Hall of the Ambassadors.

The Serello was mainly built during the reign of Yusuf 1 in the middle of the 14th century. It was largely decorated thanks to serving as the reception area of embassies and distinguished guests.
It consists of a selection of very attractive rooms and courtyards. The most appealing is the Patio of Myrtles (Patio de los Arrayanes), with its pool flanked by myrtle bushes. At its northern end lies the Comares Tower (Torre de Comares) within the Hall of the Boat (Sala de la Barca) lies. The Hall of the Boat has a fabulous ceiling, though it is a copy of the original following a fire in the 19th century.
Further into the tower, lies the Hall of the Ambassadors, which is the largest and possibly the finest room in the entire Royal Palace. It is a perfect square, and has a esquisite wooden dome, which was meant to symbolize the seven heavens. This hall was the staging ground for Sultan Boabdil's signing of Granada's surrender to the Catholic king and queen, as well as the place where King Fernando later the same year discussed the voyage of Columbus to find the sea route to India.





By Tore Kjeilen